MUSICOLOGY

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

Music is everywhere

From the concert hall and the supermarket to MySpace on the Internet. Music is also used along with other aesthetic forms of expression within theatre, opera, film and installation art. The Master’s degree in Musicology gives you an opportunity to acquire specialised knowledge about the many forms and practices of music and therefore about the use of music and sound for stage performances, to add meaning, atmosphere and stimulation and in general about the use of music and sound as a form of communication.

Music – communication, organisation and practice

The Master’s degree programme in Musicology has two tracks: In Music, Sound and Communication you study music as an historical, cultural and/or aesthetic phenomenon and acquire increased understanding of the sound dimension of modern life by analysing and producing intelligent and aesthetic sound spaces and surroundings. In this track you also have an opportunity to shape your degree programme by choosing profile subjects or project-oriented training at a private sector company or at a cultural institution.

The other track, the teacher track, focuses on musical communication of, for example, rhythmic vocal arrangements, and you will get an opportunity for in-depth study of special themes relating to music theory, music history and music culture. In this track you likewise have an opportunity to shape your degree programme by choosing profile subjects and develop a teacher profile or an international profile or to complete project-oriented training.

Develop your relationship with music

You develop a relationship with music and sound, as a cultural, historical and theoretical phenomenon, and with music as your subject field you acquire sound knowledge and understanding of the importance of musical genres. As a student of Musicology, you are ‘on’, whether you study subjects such as choir management, present audio productions or make presentations. You therefore learn to communicate confidently and vividly, and you are trained to carry out management functions, participate in process management and creative problem-solving in connection with practical/musical and creative work processes. Collaboration is an important component of Musicology – not only when you collaborate with others but also in connection with project and production work, for instance when you produce film scores and audio walks in groups.

Tracks

The Master’s degree programme in Musicology counts as two years of full-time study (120 ECTS credits) and has three different tracks. Click here to read about which track might be suitable for you.

Music, Sound and Communication

(Track A in the academic regulations)

In this track, you study the use of music and sound for stage performances and to create meaning and atmosphere, to promote consumption, to motivate or stimulate – i.e. music and sound as a form of communication in different genres and in cultural, historical and aesthetic contexts. You get an opportunity to acquire specialised knowledge and practical skills in this field by working with theory, analysis as well as design and production in the course of the degree programme.

  • By studying recent research results as well as more traditional topics, you acquire insight into the way music and sound work as meaningful, communicative and historical phenomena.
  • You learn practical tools to analyse and interpret music in different forms of expression and in different media. You can, for example, get an opportunity to work with creating action and suspense in audio-visual expressions; with the role of music and sound in the creation of brand identities and recollection, or with ways to interpret modern popular music in a scientific context.
  • You also try working with design and the production of music and sound. In a number of production assignments you design, for example, the sounds for an audio-visual production or the sound logo in a branding strategy. You therefore acquire fundamental knowledge about the production and implementation of intelligent and aesthetic sound spaces and surroundings.

In addition to these core competences, you create your own profile during the third term of the Master"s degree programme. You can read more about profiling under the Profiles in the menu.

Teacher track

(Tracks B and C in the academic regulations)

You get an opportunity to improve your skills as a communicator in general as well as in musical contexts, whether you work with specialised skills in choir management and vocal arrangements or discuss theoretical/analytical issues.

In addition, you get an opportunity for in-depth study of selected themes within musical theory, music history and music culture. In this context, you can choose to study subjects in Track A or complete projects of a more individual nature relating to Musicology.

Which track is relevant for you?

For structural reasons, the academic regulations for the degree programme are divided into three tracks: Tracks A, B and C The way you choose to structure your major subject and supplementary subject determines which track is best for you.

  • Track A consists of 120 ECTS credits in Musicology and targets students who have a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Musicology plus a supplementary subject.
  • Track B consists of 60 ECTS credits in Musicology combined with 60 ECTS credits in a supplementary subject. Track B is for students with a Bachelor’s degree with a major in Musicology, combined with a supplementary subject at Bachelor’s degree level or the first part of a subsidiary subject in another subject taught at upper secondary school.
  • Track C consists of 120 ECTS credits in Musicology and targets students with a Bachelor’s degree in another subject taught at upper secondary school as their basic subject and a supplementary subject in Musicology at Bachelor’s degree level. In Track C, you have an opportunity to make Musicology your main subject.

Admission requirements

A Master’s degree in Music Studies counts as two years of full-time study (120 ECTS credits) and is divided into three tracks:

  • Track A consists of two years of Musicology – Music, Sound and Communication
  • Track B involves 1¼ years of Musicology combined with ¾ year of studies in another subject taught at upper secondary school.

The requirements for admission to the Master’s degree programme in Musicology vary according to the track you wish to enrol in.

Track A (120 ECTS credits in Musicology):

The admissions requirement for Track A of the Master's programme is a completed Bachelor's degree with a minimum of

  • 45 ECTS credits from a supplementary subject in Musicology or Music Culture at Bachelor’s degree level

    or

  • a minimum of 120 ECTS credits relating to Musicology.

Examples of Bachelor’s degrees qualifying for admission to Track A:

  • The Bachelor’s degree in Musicology (Aarhus University) cf. Article 14 of the Executive Order on Enrolment.
  • The Bachelor’s degree in Music (Copenhagen University or Aalborg University)
  • Other Bachelor’s degrees (all universities) with a supplementary subject in Musicology or Music Culture at Bachelor’s degree level (45 ECTS credits) (Aarhus University)

Track B (75 ECTS credits in Musicology with a supplementary subject at Master’s degree level of 45 ECTS credits):

The admission requirement to Track B of the Master’s degree is a completed Bachelor’s degree with 135 ECTS credits in Musicology, the teacher track, and a supplementary subject at Bachelor’s degree level (45 ECTS credits) in another subject taught at upper secondary school.

Examples of Bachelor’s degrees qualifying for admission to Track B:

  • The Bachelor’s degree programme in Musicology (Aarhus University and Copenhagen University) with 45 ECTS credits in a supplementary subject taught at upper secondary school (e.g. German, History, Social Science, Rhetoric, Science, Film and Television, etc.).

Other qualifications can provide admission to the Master’s degree programme, provided the university assesses that their level, extent and content correspond to the degrees mentioned above. 

Selection criteria

As the Master’s degree programme in Musicology (due to government legislation) only admits a limited number of students each year, meeting the admission requirements does not in itself guarantee admission to the programme.

In evaluating qualified applicants, the admissions committee assesses each applicant on the basis of the average mark (i.e. GPA) of the Bachelor’s degree at the time of application. Marks/grades obtained after the application deadline will not be included in the GPA. 

The admissions committee assesses each applicant’s marks on the basis of the information provided by diplomas and transcripts.

Language requirements

Admission to the Master’s degree programme in Music Studies requires Danish at A level or similar. You also need to be able to read English and at least one more foreign language. Please see the page on language requirements.

Documentation

See the general documentation requirements.

Please note that applicants are NOT required to upload course descriptions.

Programme structure

Academic regulations

As a student it is important to know the regulations for your chosen subject: what is the content, how is it structured and what does it require from you. You can find this information in the academic regulations.

 

In the following graphical presentation of the subject you can see the different modules and courses that, in addition, link to the course catalogue where you can read the course descriptions.


 

Student life

A unique study environment at the section for Musicology

As a Master’s degree student of Musicology, you have an opportunity to be part of the lively student environment at the section. In addition to participating in the varied and modern forms of learning and teaching, you have many opportunities to get involved in activities that are not study-related.

The Section for Musicology organises two annual theme weeks: the Cæcilia week in the autumn and 10_eren in the spring as regular events on the calendar. During these weeks, you can participate in creative/musical workshops, enjoy interesting guest lectures or panel debates, discuss study-related themes or personally take the initiative to organise an event of special interest to you.

In addition, the section organises a large number of activities during the semester: The choir of music students, parties, concert cafés, a song contest, the Aarhus University Big Band and much, much more. You can also participate in political work in the Boards of Study or Student Committees, where you can influence both the academic content of the degree programme and the subject of the next theme week.

The interdisciplinary study environment at the former barracks

Musicology is based at the beautifully restored Kaserne – the former barracks in Langelandsgade. The Kaserne provides the framework for the Department of Aesthetic Studies and therefore for Musicology, Comparative Literature, Aesthetics and Culture, Dramaturgy, Art History and Rhetoric. Consequently, students from the different aesthetic subjects work together to organise different study-related and social events such as a joint departmental newspaper, lecturers, Friday bars and parties. The result is a unique interdisciplinary study environment cutting across all subjects at the department.

There are many activities apart from teaching at the former barracks. These activities are a good way to meet students from other year groups and degree programmes and can contribute to making your life as a student more varied. Here are a few examples of what you can experience:

  • The bar at the former barracks: The Friday bar takes place in the Kasernescenen’s canteen. The bar serves cold beer every Friday from 14.00–20.00 accompanied by aesthetic input. The Friday bar often presents live music and once a month decorates the entrance hall according to a theme and stays open until midnight. The Friday bar is run by students and is always in need of volunteers to man the bar and be part of the management team.
  • KaserneRevyen: If you like to have fun with a hint of seriousness and you would like to try to collaborate with students from other aesthetic subjects, the KaserneRevyen theatre would be a good choice for you. The theatre endeavours to create a tradition for gathering shared strengths, ideas and abilities. You can make your mark on the KaserneRevyen theatre, which is always on the look out for new members.
  • Visir: Visir is a paper published by students at the barracks and is a result of the commitment of the students and their interest in writing.  Visir looks after the interests of the students and endeavours to involve as many students as possible – as writers, editors and readers. Everyone is free to speak in Visir. It is not restricted to students of specific subjects and does not use academic jargon. Visir accepts poems and short stories as well as academic articles and essays. Click here for more information.

Subject-specific associations and magazines Mobil, Peripeti, Passage, Passepartout, Standart, Impuls, FIMS, Apéritif, Nordisk Museologi, DraFo and Variant.

Follow the student life at Aarhus University

-experienced, photographed and filmed by the students themselves.

With thousands of pictures #yourniversity gives insight into the everyday life as a student at AU; the parties, procrastination, exams and all the other ways you’ll spend your time at university.

 

The photos belong to the users, shared with #Yourniversity, #AarhusUni and course-specific AU-hashtags.

Career

Job functions for grads

This data is derived from AU's 2013/2014 employment survey. This data should not be considered a completely accurate representation of the labour market and job functions for all graduates of the individual degree programmes. It exclusively represent the responses submitted to the survey in the years in question.

Job profile

As a graduate of Musicology, you have an wide range of job opportunities: Teaching at the Section for Musicology involves a number of education theory dimensions: Graduates from this track typically find work as upper secondary school teachers or teachers at training colleges or folk high schools while others work with development, coaching or team building. In recent years, the role of sound in marketing and advertising has increased dramatically and in the Music, Sound and Communication track you become qualified to work with music and sound in the media industry and similar areas.

The following are examples of potential career paths:

  • In the cultural sector as a coordinator, project manager, consultant, information officer, producer, critic or musician.
  • Within IT, media and music as editors of music sections on the Internet, composers of music for computer games, developers of music programmes, consultants or company advisers.
  • Many become teachers at upper secondary schools, folk high schools, continuing education or evening classes while others work with development, coaching, team building, etc.
  • Graduates from Tracks B and C are qualified to teach at upper secondary school and can apply for teacher training positions at Danish upper secondary schools.

You can also pursue a career as a researcher, as graduates can apply for admission to a PhD programme at the university. Click here to read more about PhD programmes at Aarhus University.

Competence profile

The degree programme teaches you a range of different skills:

  • Management and communication: As a music student, you are ‘on’ – whether as a conductor, key speaker, singer or musician. You therefore learn to communicate in a confident and lively manner, and you are trained to carry out management functions, participate in process management and creative problem-solving in connection with practical/musical work processes.
  • Structuring: You learn to work independently and to define, structure and implement projects and processes.
  • Collaboration: Collaboration and coordination are important parts of music – in connection with ensembles, musical accompaniment and conducting choirs, for example. You therefore learn how to work together as well as possible, and to understand your own role in an ensemble or conductor situation.
  • The many faces of music: You learn to look at music as a cultural, historical and theoretical phenomenon, and you acquire in-depth knowledge of the different genres that characterise different periods and parts of the world (with an emphasis on western music).

Career Guidance

Please contact the Student Counselling Office for advice about employment opportunities and the subject profile options of your degree programme.

You can read more about the career services that are available from Arts Karriere who provide information about employment opportunities as well as arranging various events and workshops.