LAW

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

The Master’s degree in law is a two-year degree programme that leads to an LLM degree. To be admitted to the Master’s degree programme, you must have completed a Bachelor’s degree in law.

The Master’s degree in law is taught at the Department of Law at Aarhus University, where you expand on your methodological skills and legal knowledge. During the Master’s degree programme, you must prepare a major written assignment (a thesis) in which you work independently with major legal issues.

A large part of the Master’s degree programme consists of elective courses, and as a student, you have an opportunity to structure your degree programme according to your interests and career goals, e.g. by selecting subjects taught at other departments or universities.

The Department of Law has exchange agreements with more than 50 universities in Europe and the Nordic countries. In addition, the Department has a very popular exchange agreement with the South Texas College of Law in Houston, Texas, as well as with other American universities and universities in Australia, China, Japan and Singapore. Master’s degree students therefore have excellent opportunities for undertaking study periods abroad of up to one year.

As a law student, you can also replace a subject at the Department with a period of practical training, e.g. at an embassy, with the UN or in an EU institution.

The Master’s degree programme includes two compulsory courses: tax law and civil procedure.

In addition, you must take a number of elective subjects and write a thesis corresponding to 30 ECTS credits. In at least one of the elective subjects, the teaching must take place in English.

In the Master’s degree programme, you can choose to take up to half of your subjects outside the Department of Law, e.g. at the Department of Psychology or the Department of Political Science. The only requirement is that these subjects must be at the same academic level as your law subjects and be relevant to your work as a lawyer.

Admission requirements

Admission Requirements

The entry requirement for the Master of Laws education is a Danish or equivalent Bachelor of Laws degree with grade 6 without rounding, or grade 02 using the 7 point scale.

The admission criteria to the higher level module for legal practice are that the applicant has been accepted for the course for the Master of Laws degree and is among the students who have achieved the highest 25 % average marks in the Bachelor of Laws degree.

Click here for information on admission requirements and procedures 

Programme structure

Academic regulations


 

Student life

The entry requirement for the Master of Laws education is a Danish or equivalent Bachelor of Laws degree with grade 6 without rounding, or grade 02 using the 7 point scale. The admission criteria to the higher level module for legal practice are that the applicant has been accepted for the course for the Master of Laws degree and is among the students who have achieved the highest 25 % average marks in the Bachelor of Laws degree. Click here for information on admission requirements and procedures

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Career

Job functions for grads

This data is derived from AU's 2013/2014 employment survey. This data should not be considered a completely accurate representation of the labour market and job functions for all graduates of the individual degree programmes. It exclusively represent the responses submitted to the survey in the years in question.

Competence profile

The purpose of the legal Master’s degree programme is to equip students with the necessary qualifications to work with legal issues in both the public and the private sectors. Upon completion of the degree, the student must be able to investigate, analyse and solve theoretical and practical legal issues. The degree programme also aims at providing students with the competences described below.

The degree programme must equip you to work within the legal system, e.g. in courts, law firms, within the police and public prosecution, and public and private administration, as well as in international organisations. In addition, the degree programme must give you the necessary skills to qualify for admission to a PhD degree programme.

Intellectual competences – as a law graduate, you can:

  • work independently, both alone and in teams.
  • work in a goal-oriented and structured manner and combine several legal disciplines.
  • work systematically with complex legal issues.
  • plan your own learning, including acquiring and communicating knowledge in a foreign language.
  • rapidly and independently familiarise yourself with new issues and large cases.

Academic competences – a law graduate can apply legal methodology at a specialised level in order to:

  • identify and understand complicated legal issues and contexts.
  • analyse complicated legal issues using all relevant legal sources.
  • apply international perspectives.
  • take societal issues into consideration when solving legal issues.
  • take the societal aspects of law into consideration when choosing between different legal solutions.

A law graduate is able to communicate and formulate specialised legal issues, both verbally and in writing. A law graduate can reason at a high level and choose between legal solutions.

Practical competences – in the case of complicated legal issues within specialised fields, a law graduate can:

  • assess whether a case has been sufficiently examined.
  • make decisions.
  • give advice at a high level within several branches of law.
  • write legal documents.

Career

As an LLM, you can become employed at the courts and within public prosecution or become qualified to practise as a lawyer after working for three years as a lawyer’s clerk and passing an exam.

As a law graduate you have an exclusive right to become:

  • a lawyer, judge or prosecutor.

Many law graduates also find work in:

  • ministries, municipalities, regions, banks, insurance companies, the private business community and international organisations.

It is not unusual for law firms to recruit employees directly from law school.

If you would like to undertake further law studies, the opportunities for completing a PhD degree are very good. For further information, click here.