HEALTH SCIENCE

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.


Photo: Lars Kruse, Aarhus University



The two-year Master’s degree programme in health science leads to an MSc (cand.scient.san.) degree. This is a relatively recent degree programme as the first class of 21 students began their studies in September 1997. Since then, a similar number of students have been admitted to the programme each year.

The Master’s degree programme in health science mainly targets Bachelors working in the health science profession. The purpose of the degree programme is to qualify graduates:

  • to develop their own documentation, evaluation and working methodologies on a scientific basis.
  • to further qualify teachers of basic studies.
  • to qualify health sector personnel for positions aimed at developing their own subject.

This degree programme has an interdisciplinary profile, as it has proved to attract students with different backgrounds, regarding both professional practice and basic education. Nurses make up the largest individual professional group of approximately 40%. The remaining students mainly consist of physiotherapists, bioanalysts and occupational therapists, but students with other basic studies have also been admitted, including midwives, perfusionists, surgical appliance makers, clinical dieticians, dental hygienist and radiographers.



Photo: Lars Kruse, Aarhus University

Admission requirements

The Master's Degree Programme in Health Science is offered as of 1 September 2015 with two tracks: Track a) 'Prioritisation track – assessment of initiatives in the healthcare system' and track b) 'Rehabilitation track – complex interventions and cross-sectoral cooperation'.

The following courses of study qualify students for admission to the Master's Degree Programme in Health Science:

  • A Bachelor's degree programme in health science
  • A medium-cycle higher education degree programme (MVU) in health science followed by a minimum of 15 ECTS from a diploma degree programme in health science or a Bachelor's degree programme in health science
  • Bachelor's degree in medicine or a Bachelor's degree in odontology.

Following an individual academic assessment, dispensation may be granted for the admission of applicants with comparable academic qualifications – e.g. a medium-cycle higher education degree programme (MVU) in health science where it can be documented that the applicant has acquired competences comparable to a Bachelor's degree programme in health science.

Restricted admission and priority criteria

Fifty students can be admitted to the degree programme annually. Students are admitted once a year for commencement of studies on 1 September.

As a general rule, 25 students are admitted to each of the tracks established. The number of places stated is guiding only and subject to change by the university.

Applications for admission to the tracks must be made individually in the application system. If applicants want to apply for admission to both tracks, they must thus actively do so. In connection with the application, the applicant will be asked to indicate which track has the highest priority. You should apply for admission to the track(s) in which you are interested. Regardless of whether you apply for admission to one or both tracks, you will be assessed based on your qualifications and not based on the priority you have assigned to the particular track.

If the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number of places offered, the qualified applicants will be prioritised according to the following criteria:

1. Applicants with at least two years of practical experience within their clinical area at the time of application

2. Applicants with mathematics (level B)

3. Applicants with English (level B)

4. Applicants with documented academic experience. This could be employment in a research environment where the applicant has conducted research or participated in other people's research, or having published articles in academic or scholarly journals. When you document your participation in a research project, it must be stated which role you have had in the research project. 

5. Priority is then given to the applicants with the highest average mark from their qualifying course of study.

The priority criteria must be met by 1 April of the year the applicant is applying for admission to the Master's degree program.

For applicants who have completed their qualifying course of study at the time of handing in the application and who have a certificate stating the average mark calculated, this average mark will be used. If an average mark has not been calculated, Aarhus University will calculate a simple average.

In the case of applicants who have not completed the entire basis for admission at the time of handing in the application, Aarhus University will calculate a simple average for the disciplines which have been completed at the time of handing in the application and which are included in the basis for admission, taking into account all graded assessments from the Bachelor's degree programme.

For applicants who do not have a professional Bachelor's degree, the mark from their medium-cycle higher education degree programme will be used and not the mark from the subsequent supplementary courses. As the selection criterion is the average mark from the medium-cycle higher education degree programme, you must attach your complete certificate with your application, i.e. all the pages of your certificate and not only the front page. The average mark is calculated on the basis of all the marks on your certificate regardless of whether they are internal or external. All marks according to the Danish 13-point marking scale are first converted into the 7-point marking scale, and the average mark is then calculated.

Programme structure

The Master of Health Science course takes 2 years to complete and corresponds to 120 ECTS points. The first couple of terms are devoted to learning research methodology skills in epidemiology and biostatistics. The following terms include subjects like quality development, health economics and organisation, enabling the students to understand and assess the key concepts of a Medical Technology Assessment (MTA). The students write their thesis during the final term and defend it at an oral examination.

Academic regulations


 

Student life

"We have a good study environment at the healthcare Master’s degree programme. We have our own little base in the MPH building where students across year groups meet each other. My fellow students are generally very helpful and friendly."
(Dorte Wiwe, student, Public Health)

The working methods used in the healthcare Master's degree programme are a combination of lectures and group work. The many opportunities for collaboration, combined with small year groups, mean that the students quickly get to know each other.

Practically all students on the degree programme have a healthcare professional Bachelor's degree programme before they begin on the healthcare Master’s degree programme. Most have worked for several years within their subject before applying for the degree programme. They have typically started a family and do not therefore take part in student life on campus in the same way as students who begin at university immediately after the upper secondary school leaving examination.

A shared focal point

All teaching takes place in building 1264 where there are both large auditoriums and small rooms for group work. The students quickly become part of a well-functioning study environment, with good contact between year groups. The degree programme is located on the campus close to the other study programmes offered by the Department of Public Health.

"We establish study groups from the very beginning of the programme and these are a great help both on a day-to-day basis and for studying for exams. In general, we have a lot of group and project-based work, which means that you get to know the other students really well."
(Dorte Wiwe, student, Public Health)




Photo: Lars Kruse, Aarhus University

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Career

Job functions for grads

This data is derived from AU's 2013/2014 employment survey. This data should not be considered a completely accurate representation of the labour market and job functions for all graduates of the individual degree programmes. It exclusively represent the responses submitted to the survey in the years in question.


"We have a good study environment at the healthcare Master’s degree programme. We have our own little base in the MPH building where students across year groups meet each other. My fellow students are generally very helpful and friendly."
(Dorte Wiwe, student, Public Health)

The working methods used in the healthcare Master's degree programme are a combination of lectures and group work. The many opportunities for collaboration, combined with small year groups, mean that the students quickly get to know each other.

Practically all students on the degree programme have a healthcare professional Bachelor's degree programme before they begin on the healthcare Master’s degree programme. Most have worked for several years within their subject before applying for the degree programme. They have typically started a family and do not therefore take part in student life on campus in the same way as students who begin at university immediately after the upper secondary school leaving examination.

A shared focal point

All teaching takes place in building 1264 where there are both large auditoriums and small rooms for group work. The students quickly become part of a well-functioning study environment, with good contact between year groups. The degree programme is located on the campus close to the other study programmes offered by the Department of Public Health.

"We establish study groups from the very beginning of the programme and these are a great help both on a day-to-day basis and for studying for exams. In general, we have a lot of group and project-based work, which means that you get to know the other students really well."
(Dorte Wiwe, student, Public Health)




Photo: Lars Kruse, Aarhus University