GERMAN LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND CULTURE

Introduction

This programme is only offered in Danish.

Germany has everything

Fassbinder, Goethe, Einstein, Marx and the Nazis. Germany is the home of great art, great thoughts, and ideologies that have moved us and changed our perception of the world and history itself. During its brief history, Germany has experienced great wars, charismatic leaders, division and reunion, financial ups and downs and fights for survival among European superpowers. Today’s Germany is a much more peaceful place with a focus on development, economic stability, close collaboration with other members of the EU and ongoing integration between East and West. Today, the country is one of Denmark’s main trading partners and plays an important role in Europe. In the Master’s degree in German, you can study the parts of German culture and identity that interest you. You acquire in-depth knowledge of German language, history, culture and social conditions as well as general skills within cultural understanding and structuring.

In the course of the degree programme, you have an opportunity to complete an internship where you can test your skill in a job situation and target your degree towards the industry in which you would like to work upon completion of your degree. You can also plan your degree by completing profile subjects at the Faculty of Humanities or other faculties. As a German graduate, you can find work in the private business sector or become a teacher.

Culture, Literature and Society

You already have sound knowledge of German language and German culture from your Bachelor’s degree programme. In the Master’s degree programme, this knowledge will be further developed. You work with both literary theory and literary texts at lectures, in group work, presentations by yourself and your fellow students, seminars and assignments. You can study the German expressionists, learn about the role of the past for the identity and culture of the present, and analyse Friedrich Schlegel’s works. You sharpen your analytical skills when analysing German literature and social issues across different periods and styles. This teaches you to distinguish between what is important and what is not and to identify key questions and solutions. Your degree programme teaches you to facilitate communication between German and Danish, both linguistically and culturally. You learn to communicate a message to specific target groups and get a deeper insight into linguistic and oral communication in general.

Many career paths

With a Master’s degree in German, you have many potential career paths. Your linguistic and cultural skills can, for example, be used for administrative work, as a translator or interpreter or as a facilitator. You can become a teacher at upper secondary school or work in private companies doing business with Germany.

Admission requirements

A Master's degree in German Language, Literature and Culture (Track B) counts as two years of full-time study (120 ECTS credits) and consist of 1 1/4 years' of study (75 ECTS credits) of German Language, Literature and Culture combined with 3/4 year of study (45 ECTS credits) of another subject taught at upper secondary school.

Track B (75 ECTS credits in German Language, Literature and Culture with 45 ECTS credits from a supplementary subject at Master's degree level)

Admission to the Master’s degree programme in German Language, Literature and Culture (line B) at Aarhus University requires:

  • A completed Bachelor’s degree consisting of at least 135 ECTS credits in German Language, Literature and Culture (Aarhus University) or German (University of Copenhagen, Aalborg University or University of Southern Denmark), with a Bachelor’s supplementary subject (45 ECTS) in another subject within the range of upper-secondary school subjects.

Other degree programmes deemed by the university to correspond in terms of level, scope and content to the above-mentioned degree programmes may qualify the student for admission to the Master’s degree programme.

Selection criteria

As the Master’s degree programme in German Language, Literature and Culture (due to government legislation) only admits a limited number of students each year, meeting the admission requirements does not in itself guarantee admission to the programme.

In evaluating qualified applicants, the admissions committee assesses each applicant on the basis of the average mark (i.e. GPA) of the Bachelor’s degree at the time of application. Marks/grades obtained after the application deadline will not be included in the GPA. 

The admissions committee assesses each applicant’s marks on the basis of the information provided by diplomas and transcripts. 

Language requirements

In addition to the above, the following language requirements apply for admission to the Master’s degree programme in German Language, Literature and Culture: - Danish at upper-secondary scho ol ‘A’ level or the equivalent.

Programme structure

Track A

4th semester

Thesis

3rd semester

Profile subjects

 

Profile subjects

Profile subjects

2nd semester

Text, History and Identity

Communication, Media and Society

Theoretical and Practical Communication

1st semester

Current Culture, Society and History Studies

Approaches and Trends in Modern German Literature

Change, Exchange and Translation

 

Track B 

4th semester

Thesis

 

3rd semester

Profile subjects

 

Profile subjects

Profile subjects

2nd semester

Supplementary subject at MA level

Text, History and Identity

or

Communication, Media and Society

Theoretical and Practical Communication

 

1st semester

Supplementary subject at MA level

 

  

Track C 

4th semester

Thesis

 

3rd semester

Profile subjects

Profile subjects

 

Profile subjects

2nd semester

Communication, Media and Society

Text, History and Identity

Theoretical and Practical Communication

 

1st semester

Current Culture, Society and History Studies

Approaches and Trends in Modern German Literature

Linguistic disciplines,

details to follow

 

 

Academic regulations


 

Student life

German is well known for having an active, hard-working and friendly student environment. Some of the teaching takes place at the Section for German, and the teaching methods include a mixture of lectures, seminars, group work and presentations by students. There are many events in the course of the year at which you can meet your fellow students and teachers in different surroundings.

Kaffee-Kino introduces you to the world of German films and shows less well-known German films 3-4 times a year. This is an excellent way to meet your fellow students, as well as students from other years, in an enjoyable and academically relevant environment.

The Spring walk takes place in May of every year. At this event students and teachers complete a walk somewhere in Djursland.

Every second Thursday evening, Stammtisch gets together in the student bar, where the motto is “present time, past time, beer time, always time”. Here students socialise and speak German while drinking beer from the large selection available.

Christmas lunch The lunch is for all year groups and, according to tradition, is organised by first-year students.

The International Student Centre is the place to meet German students, practise your German and make new friends.

Esperanto is the Friday bar of the Department of Languages, Literature and Culture, organised jointly by the different language groups.

The Mobile University where university students teach at upper secondary school gives you an opportunity to test your teaching skills.

The Student Committee at the Section for German is the forum where you, as a student, can discuss all matters relating to the degree programme. By participating in the meetings of the Student Committee, you can actively contribute to ongoing improvements of the German degree programme.

Follow the student life at Aarhus University

-experienced, photographed and filmed by the students themselves.

With thousands of pictures #yourniversity gives insight into the everyday life as a student at AU; the parties, procrastination, exams and all the other ways you’ll spend your time at university.

 

The photos belong to the users, shared with #Yourniversity, #AarhusUni and course-specific AU-hashtags.

Career

Job functions for grads

This data is derived from AU's 2013/2014 employment survey. This data should not be considered a completely accurate representation of the labour market and job functions for all graduates of the individual degree programmes. It exclusively represent the responses submitted to the survey in the years in question. Note that this data is derived from different, but related programmes.

The following are the seven most common jobs for German graduates:

Teaching. Many German graduates teach at upper secondary schools, universities, training colleges, evening classes, continuing education, language schools and folk high schools.

Marketing. German graduates work in companies exporting to the German market.

Language. The excellent language skills of German graduates qualify them to work as linguists, translators and interpreters.

Project management and administration. German graduates work in management secretariats or with project management in private companies doing business with Germany.

Tourism. The degree programme qualifies you for work with the marketing of Danish products and services, project coordination and similar.

Communication. German graduates work with internal and external communication in private and public companies.

Researcher. You also have the option of applying for admission to the university’s PhD programme at the faculty’s Graduate School. You can apply when you have completed the first year of your Master’s degree studies or when you have written your thesis. 

Competence profile

The Master’s degree in German gives you the following competences:

German language. You learn a varied and grammatically correct German.

German culture. Your degree gives you basic knowledge of German literature, history, culture and social conditions.

Intercultural understanding. You learn about intercultural issues and become proficient in facilitating communication between Danish and German, both linguistically and culturally.

Communication. You become skilled at working with languages and at expressing yourself vividly and correctly.

Analysis and structuring. By reading and analysing literature and social issues across different periods and styles, you learn to sort information and recognise what is essential.

Career guidance

Please contact the Student Counselling Office for advice about employment opportunities and the subject profile options of your degree programme.

You can read more about the career services that are available from Arts Karriere who provide information about employment opportunities as well as arranging various events and workshops.